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Organisation

Fame ! By BATS. This weekend!

Posted by on 24th March, 2019 in News, Organisation

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Salute to Heroes!

Posted by on 21st November, 2018 in News, Organisation

What A Cracking Show! From start to finish, there was energy and enthusiasm, fun and laughter, as well as the pathos of  remembrance. BATS put on a show that did what it said it would. With a total  audience of some 250 people, who not only laughed at the sketches, joined in the singing, but were full of praise for the whole cast! Well Done BATS ! A Family Friendly evening of celebration , in song, drama, and comedy, marking the Centenary of the end of WW1. The evening will be of interest to all age groups. The cast includes our youngest as well as the more mature members, and will have your feet tapping and your heart singing by the end of the evening....

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Contact the Elderly

Posted by on 16th November, 2012 in Organisation

Contact the Elderly

Name: Contact the Elderly Summary: “Contact the Elderly” is a registered charity, founded by Trevor Lyttleton in 1965. For over 40 years Contact the Elderly groups around the country have been organising free tea parties for small groups of older people, aged 75 and above, who live alone and would appreciate some company on a Sunday afternoon. In February 2012, Contact the Elderly had over 400 groups in England, Scotland and Wales, which provide a regular, consistent and vital friendship link every month to approximately 3,400 older people, aged 75 and above. By 2015, the charity’s 50th anniversary, Contact the Elderly aims to increase the number of groups it operates to over 600, enabling the charity to support over 5,000 older people each month – with the support of a volunteer network of over 7,500 individuals. Contact the Elderly works by a volunteer driver collecting older persons from their home by and taking them to a volunteer host’s home for the afternoon. A different host welcomes the guests each month but the drivers remain the same, which helps friendships develop. Phone Number: 01234...

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Wildlife Project

Posted by on 16th November, 2012 in Organisation

Wildlife Project

Name: Wildlife Project Summary: Built up Areas Nearly a fifth of the three parishes are covered with houses and other buildings, gardens, farmyards and storage areas, motorway, railway and roads. Older buildings provide shelter, nesting and breeding sites for birds such as swallows, swifts and martins, and for bats. Many people feed birds, put up nest boxes and build ponds in their gardens. The contribution made by those people in the area who manage their land with an eye to wildlife must be immense. Churchyards too make a contribution, and motorway, road and railway verges provide strips of rough grassland where interesting plants such as pyramidal orchid and scurvey grass can be found. Grassland Most local grassland has been improved in one way or another over the last hundred years or so to provide high quality grass for silage and hay. A few fields still contain wild flowers and meadow plants, which have long since disappeared from elsewhere. Alongside the river on the flood plain, we can still find lady’s smock, ragged robin, wild grasses and sedges. On some drier slopes centaury, selfheal, knapweed and stemless thistle provide colour and a source of nectar for butterflies and other insects. Trees, Hedges and Lanes Since losing our magnificent elm trees, much of the landscape is dominated by willows on the flood plain giving way to ash and oak along the valley sides. Two very special trees in our area are the rare black poplars with their magnificent red catkins in early spring, and the equally interesting wild service trees, a handful of which grow along one or two older parish boundary hedges. Stretches of blackthorn hedge, away from the flail, support small colonies of the scarce brown hairstreak butterfly. The closely related purple hairstreak is found associated with large, old oak trees. Some stretches of more ancient hedges, particularly those on the parish boundaries, contain fourteen or more woody shrub and tree species. Butterflies Nearly thirty different butterflies are found in the three parishes. The brimstone, the small tortoishell, orange tip and holly blue are usually the first to appear in the spring. Later, alongside our hedges and amongst trees hedge browns, speckled woods and ringlets seek out the sunshine and dappled shade. In gardens, large and small whites, peacocks, red admirals and commas are commonly seen. The scarce brown hairstreak is occasionally encountered near blackthorn, whilst you need to look carefully towards the tops of oak trees to see the closely related, more common purple hairstreak. Later in the year we may be visited by clouded yellows and painted ladies both of which come from the continent and are unable to survive out cold, wet winters. One of our largest and most spectacular butterflies – the silver-washed fritillary is only rarely seen in sunny glades in scrub and woodland where its food-plant, violet grows. Birds Birds are to be seen almost everywhere. Common birds in gardens include robin, blackbird, house sparrow, blue and great tits, greenfinches and chaffinches. Along the river and the canal moorhens, mallard, mute swans and kingfishers are regularly seen. Look for common sandpipers in the early spring and autumn when they pass through on migration and keep your eyes open for water rails creeping through bankside vegetation in the winter months. Buzzards and kestrels are often seen soaring and hovering overhead. Crows, rooks, magpies, jays and the occasional raven search fields, hedgerows and copses for food. Chiffchaffs and will warblers are our two commonest summer visiting warblers. Skylarks and yellowhammers are declining but the nightingale can still be heard on a quiet night if you...

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Church of England Primary School

Posted by on 16th November, 2012 in Organisation

Church of England Primary School

Name: Church of England Primary School Summary: The School is very fortunate to have the support of a very active Parent, Teacher and Friends Association. A meeting is held termly to arrange a variety of fund-raising and social events, which are popular with children and parents alike. All parents are welcome to join the PTFA and all offers of help are gratefully received. Phone Number: 01234 567890

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Beavers

Posted by on 16th November, 2012 in Organisation

Beavers

Name: Beavers Summary: For boys aged 6 (or three months leading up to their sixth birthday) to 8 years meet on Wednesdays from 6.00 – 7.30pm during term time. They can move to the next Section, Cub Scouts, between seven years and six months and eight years six months. Phone Number: 01234 567890

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News

Salute to Heroes!

21st November, 2018

Parish Council News.

4th June, 2018